When it comes to Indian Boarding School Graves, Tribal Spiritual Law is Shunned as Repatriations Continue to Fail Some Tribes

In 1879, Carlisle Barracks became the site of the nation’s first government-run Indian boarding school. It was operated by the Department of the Interior until 1918. Under the motto of “kill the Indian, save the man,” it tried to forcibly assimilate 7,800 Native American children from more than 140 tribal nations through a mix of Western-style education and hard labor. At least 186 children died there, of disease often made worse by poor living conditions and abuse.

First Nation takes Yukon gov’t to court over ‘fundamentally flawed’ consultations

The First Nation of Na-Cho Nyäk Dun (FNNND) filed a petition to the Yukon Supreme Court last year, soon after the Yukon government gave the green light to Vancouver-based Metallic Minerals Corp.’s project. The quartz exploration project is to happen over 10 years on 52 claims located north of Mayo, Yukon, and within the First Nation’s traditional territory. The problem, according to the First Nation, is that the Yukon government didn’t seem to give much thought to FNNND’s interests or concerns before signing off on the project. 

$1.1B class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of former ‘Indian hospital’ patients

The lawsuit focuses on 29 segregated hospitals operated across the country by the federal government between 1945 and the early 1980s. Researchers say thousands of Indigenous patients may have been admitted to the institutions during that four-decade span. The facilities were overcrowded and inadequately staffed, alleges the statement of claim.